A kaleidoscope of colors: Stunning new space images from the James Webb Telescope released


A near-infrared view from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope of the Pillars of Creation.  The pillars look like bows and arrows emerging from a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent gas and dust and are constantly changing.

NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI).

A near-infrared view from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope of the Pillars of Creation. The pillars look like bows and arrows emerging from a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent gas and dust and are constantly changing.

NASA has released stunning new images showing a kaleidoscope of colors in space, taken by the James Webb Telescope.

The images show the Pillars of Creation, a view of three massive towers made of interstellar gas and dust studded with newly formed stars.

The pillars, which are a mixture of dense clouds of hydrogen gas and dust, lie at the heart of the Eagle Nebula which is an active star-forming region about 6,500 light-years from Earth. .

About 19 years ago, the first Hubble Space Telescope photographed the pillarsand now Nasa’s new James Webb Telescope has recreated the iconic image – giving astronomers a closer, more detailed look at the stunning scene.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope made the Pillars of Creation famous with its first image in 1995, but revisited the scene in 2014 to reveal a sharper, wider view in visible light, pictured above left.  A new view in near-infrared light from Nasa's James Webb Space Telescope, right, helps us see through more dust in this star-forming region.

NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope made the Pillars of Creation famous with its first image in 1995, but revisited the scene in 2014 to reveal a sharper, wider view in visible light, pictured above left. A new view in near-infrared light from Nasa’s James Webb Space Telescope, right, helps us see through more dust in this star-forming region.

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According to NASA, the detailed image was captured by Webb’s near-infrared camera. Among the many fascinating details, it was the bright red young stars that intrigued astronomers.

A Press release from the European Space Agency called the newly formed protostars “the scene stealers”.

“When nodes with sufficient mass form in the pillars of gas and dust, they begin to collapse under their own gravity, slowly heat up, and eventually form new stars,” he said.

Webb’s view of the pillars will help researchers revamp their models of star formation by identifying a much more precise number of newly formed stars, as well as the amounts of gas and dust in the region, the study said. NASA in a statement. statement on line.

Over time, they will begin to better understand how stars form and erupt from these dusty clouds over millions of years, the space agency said.

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