Images from the Hubble NGC 2164 Space Telescope


A new image taken with NASA/ESA’s Hubble Space Telescope provides a detailed look at an open cluster known as NGC 2164.

This Hubble image shows NGC 2164, a young open cluster located some 160,000 light-years away in the constellation Dorado.  The color image is made up of observations from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the ultraviolet, near-infrared and optical portions of the spectrum.  It is based on data obtained through four filters.  Color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter.  Image credit: <a class=NASA / ESA / Hubble / J. Kalirai / Milone.” src=”http://cdn.sci-news.com/images/2021/08/image_9985-NGC-2164.jpg” width=”580″ height=”505″/>

This Hubble image shows NGC 2164, a young open cluster located some 160,000 light-years away in the constellation Dorado. The color image is made up of observations from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the ultraviolet, near-infrared and optical portions of the spectrum. It is based on data obtained through four filters. Color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / J. Kalirai / Milone.

Open clusters are loosely bound groups of tens to thousands of stars.

These objects are so named due to the fact that individual stars are easily resolved through a telescope.

Some examples such as the Hyades and Pleiades are so close that the individual stars can be clearly distinguished with the naked eye

The stars of an open cluster have a common origin: they formed from the same initial giant molecular cloud.

Due to their open and diffuse structure, open clusters are not particularly stable and their constituent stars might disperse after a few million years.

For this reason, they are found in spiral and irregular galaxies, where new stars form, but not in elliptical galaxies, which do not form stars and in which any open clusters would have long since disintegrated.

NGC 2164, also known as ESO 57-62 or BMG 191, is a young open cluster in the southern constellation of Dorado.

The object was first discovered on September 27, 1826 by Scottish astronomer James Dunlop.

“NGC 2164 is located in one of the Milky Way galaxy’s closest neighbors – the satellite galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud,” Hubble astronomers said.

“The Large Magellanic Cloud is a relatively small galaxy located about 160,000 light-years from Earth.”

“It is considered a satellite galaxy because it is gravitationally bound to the Milky Way.”

“In fact, the Large Magellanic Cloud is on a very slow collision course with the Milky Way – they are predicted to collide in 2.4 billion years,” they added.

“The Large Magellanic Cloud is only about a hundredth the mass of the Milky Way, but it still contains billions of stars.”

“NGC 2164 is in good company in the Large Magellanic Cloud – the satellite galaxy is home to around 700 open clusters, alongside around 60 globular clusters.”

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