Jupiter’s complex colors revealed in stunning images from NASA’s Juno spacecraft


The image has been processed to represent the approximate colors the human eye would see from Juno’s perspective. Credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS, Image processing by Björn Jónsson © CC NC SA

" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{" attribute="">NasaThe Juno spacecraft observed the complex colors and structure of Jupiter‘s clouds on July 5, 2022, as he completed his 43rd close flyby of the giant planet.

Citizen scientist Björn Jónsson of Iceland created these two images using raw data from the JunoCam instrument aboard the spacecraft. Juno was about 3,300 miles (5,300 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops at about 50 degrees latitude when the raw image was taken. North is up. At that time, the spacecraft was moving at around 130,000 mph (209,000 kilometers per hour) relative to the planet.

Jupiter's Complex Colors Processed

The second image is from the same raw data, but in this case Jónsson has digitally processed it to increase both color saturation and contrast to emphasize small-scale features and reduce compression artifacts and noise that usually appear in raw images. Credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS, Image processing by Björn Jónsson © CC NC SA

The first image (at the top of the page) has been processed to represent the approximate colors the human eye would see from the perspective of the Juno spacecraft. The second image (above) is also from the same raw data. However, in this case, Jónsson digitally processed it to increase both color saturation and contrast to emphasize small-scale features and reduce compression artifacts and noise that typically appear in raw images. . The result is an image that clearly reveals some of the most intriguing aspects of Jupiter’s atmosphere, including color variation resulting from a different chemical composition, the three-dimensional nature of Jupiter’s swirling vortices, and small clouds.” bright pop-ups that form in the upper parts of the atmosphere.

Raw images from JunoCam are available for the public to view and turn into image products. More information about NASA Citizen Science is available at https://science.nasa.gov/citizenscience and https://www.nasa.gov/solve/opportunities/citizenscience.

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